Please don't eat the skin of the apple

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ђยzєє:
from MSN news,
http://news.in.msn.com/columns/article.aspx?cp-documentid=1351808

Apples naturally produce their own waxy coating that protects its high water content which protects the fruit from wrinkling or weight loss that can be caused due to normal transpiration and respiration. At the warehouse immediately after the harvest the Apples are washed to remove chemical residues, leaves and other dirt. This wash according to experts, removes about half of the original apple wax which leaves the fruit vulnerable to drying and weight loss. Thus before being packed into cartons the fruits are given a wax coating to help it retain the moisture intact.

According to the US Apple association, these Waxes have been used on fruits and vegetables for decades reportedly since the 1920s. They are all made from natural ingredients, and are certified by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to be safe to eat. They come from natural sources including carnauba wax, from the leaves of a Brazilian palm; Candellia wax, derived from reed-like desert plants of the genus Euphorbia; and food-grade shellac, which come from a secretion of the Lac bug found in India and Pakistan. These waxes are also approved for use as food additives for candy and pastries.

You must have noticed the white chalky coating on the apples and wondered what it is or misunderstood it for some harmful chemical residue. Well the wax natural or applied when exposed to excessive heat and moisture may whiten, leaving the fruit looking patchy.

According to Washington Apple Commission the natural wax added to protect Washington apples is usually carnauba or shellac. Both are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and have been used on a variety of foods for decades. These wax formulations are natural, non-petroleum based coatings. Research has proved that waxing apples helps prevent moisture loss, enhances firmness retention and slows down the apple respiration rate keeping the fruit looking fresh longer.

According to new U.S. Food and Drug Administration rules effective May 1994, retailers must list coated produce they sell in their produce department. Apples are frequently on the list which may include up to 21 other produce items that may have wax applied to them. As little as one pound of waxy coating will cover approximately 160,000 pieces of fruit and vegetables, according to the United Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Association.

So next time you decide to pick those delicious red apples please go ahead with no fear but remember that the wax coating can be removed only by washing the fruits in warm water. The use of detergent to wash porous fruits like Apples is not recommended.

Source: India Syndicate

Amyla:
Q. I have been eating an apple daily for the last one year. Recently I found the apples coated with wax. I then read that it is done to preserve them. I have now started removing the wax before eating apples. Could you tell me what will be the effect of all the wax coated apples I have had for about an year? Is some check-up/test necessary to find out the side-effects of all the wax that has been ingested?

A. Apples are coated with shellac and carnauba wax to improve their shine because consumers prefer to buy shiny apples. It gives the fruit or vegetable a sheen, which in the eyes of some customers is a sign of quality. Wax is used for a preservation purpose and then cold stored. A coating of wax helps seal in moisture and therefore extends storage life, as well as minimizing costly weight loss. You might be surprised especially the imported apples are more than one year old, though it would look fresh.

Food industry spokespersons claim that the wax is safe to eat, it does give food an off-flavour. It also thwarts your efforts to scrub off pesticides that may have been sprayed on the fruit before it was waxed. These coatings are not harmful, but you should always rinse your apples with soap and water or with vinegar before you eat them.

Amyla:
Quote from: ђยzєє on November 24, 2008, 01:37:50 PM

from MSN news,
http://news.in.msn.com/columns/article.aspx?cp-documentid=1351808

Apples naturally produce their own waxy coating that protects its high water content which protects the fruit from wrinkling or weight loss that can be caused due to normal transpiration and respiration. At the warehouse immediately after the harvest the Apples are washed to remove chemical residues, leaves and other dirt. This wash according to experts, removes about half of the original apple wax which leaves the fruit vulnerable to drying and weight loss. Thus before being packed into cartons the fruits are given a wax coating to help it retain the moisture intact.

According to the US Apple association, these Waxes have been used on fruits and vegetables for decades reportedly since the 1920s. They are all made from natural ingredients, and are certified by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to be safe to eat. They come from natural sources including carnauba wax, from the leaves of a Brazilian palm; Candellia wax, derived from reed-like desert plants of the genus Euphorbia; and food-grade shellac, which come from a secretion of the Lac bug found in India and Pakistan. These waxes are also approved for use as food additives for candy and pastries.

You must have noticed the white chalky coating on the apples and wondered what it is or misunderstood it for some harmful chemical residue. Well the wax natural or applied when exposed to excessive heat and moisture may whiten, leaving the fruit looking patchy.

According to Washington Apple Commission the natural wax added to protect Washington apples is usually carnauba or shellac. Both are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and have been used on a variety of foods for decades. These wax formulations are natural, non-petroleum based coatings. Research has proved that waxing apples helps prevent moisture loss, enhances firmness retention and slows down the apple respiration rate keeping the fruit looking fresh longer.

According to new U.S. Food and Drug Administration rules effective May 1994, retailers must list coated produce they sell in their produce department. Apples are frequently on the list which may include up to 21 other produce items that may have wax applied to them. As little as one pound of waxy coating will cover approximately 160,000 pieces of fruit and vegetables, according to the United Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Association.

So next time you decide to pick those delicious red apples please go ahead with no fear but remember that the wax coating can be removed only by washing the fruits in warm water. The use of detergent to wash porous fruits like Apples is not recommended.

Source: India Syndicate


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Infomative......... :thumbsup2: :thumbsup2:

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Thats good info ... Thanks palki  O0

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